News Archives: 2013 November

Eagle Rock Brewery To Open New Brewpub

Nov 23

ting-su-jeremy-raub-eagle-rock-brewpubEagle Rock Brewery has earned quite a name for itself in the local craft beer scene and its taproom has become a popular hangout spot for its ever-growing legion of thirsty fans. Now, just as its fourth anniversary is upon us, co-owners Ting Su and Jeremy Raub have secured an additional location—which they’re going to call Eagle Rock Brewery Public House—that will serve not only beer, but also food.

“We always wanted to have a brewpub, even before we opened the brewery on Roswell,” explains Ting. “But we decided it was best to just start with the taproom and see if we could revisit the food side once we’d gotten the brewery established.”

eagle-rock-brewery-public-houseThe new brewpub will be located at 1627 Colorado Blvd. in Eagle Rock, where the recently shuttered vegetarian cafe Fatty’s once stood. “We started looking for a space about a year ago,” Jeremy reveals. “We shopped around a lot, but when we saw this on the market, we jumped on it. It really is ideal for us.”

The 4,500 sq. ft. brick building is a marvel; it’s designated as a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 692!) recognized for its art deco styling that dates back to 1931. Though it looks more akin to an airplane hangar with its bowed wooden ceiling, it was originally a car mechanic’s shop.

The team is hoping for a spring 2014 opening, though it will be in stages. “We’re going to get the dining portion open first,” says Ting. “Then we’ll bring the brewery equipment on board. With all the additional permitting there, that could be anywhere from six months to a year later.”

The menu direction isn’t quite nailed down yet, but there will be a focus on small plates. “And not your typical pub fare,” adds Ting. “Why would we do burgers? The Oinkster is right down the street and they already make a great burger. We’ll definitely be looking to do something unique.”

warehouse-eagle-rock-brewery-public-houseBesides the dining and bar section, which Ting estimates will seat around 50 people, there’s also a connected warehouse 2,000 sq. ft. warehouse space, which is where they will install a 15-barrel brewhouse to complement their existing 15-barrel brewhouse back at the original taproom, which will be staying in operation. Eagle Rock Brewery co-owner Steve Raub will continue to oversee production at the taproom, with Erick Garcia managing the brewing. Brewer Lee Bakofsky will be shifting over to brewing at the new brewpub once it has been installed, though Jeremy says you can expect to see people splitting their time between locations. Ting estimates that an additional 10-12 jobs will be created thanks to the new addition.

“It’s going to be really nice to have a little more flexibility,” Ting declares. “We’ll be able to do more experimental beers rather than just trying to keep up with meeting production demands.”

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AHA Survey Details Demographics and Production of Homebrewers

Nov 12

aha-infographic_mainBoulder, CO • November 12, 2013 – The American Homebrewers Association (AHA)—the not-for-profit trade association serving as a resource and community for homebrewers—released results of a first-ever nationwide homebrewer survey today, a break-down of demographics, brewing habits and shopping behaviors of American homebrewers.

According to the survey, there are an estimated 1.2 million homebrewers in the United States, two-thirds of who began brewing in 2005 or later.

“The homebrewing community is in every corner of the country and highly engaged in this hobby,” said Gary Glass, director, American Homebrewers Association. “From the amount of money spent on supplies to the sheer number of homebrewers, it’s clear this is a growing trend and people are incredibly interested in learning about and making their own brews at home.”

Survey results include:

·        Demographics: The average homebrewer is 40 years old, with most (60 percent) falling between 30 and 49 years old. The majority of homebrewers are married or in a domestic partnership (78 percent), have a college degree or some form of higher education (69 percent), and are highly affluent—nearly 60 percent of all homebrewers have household incomes of $75,000 or more.

·        Location: Homebrewers are fairly evenly spread across the country, with the slight plurality congregated in the West (31 percent), followed by the South (26 percent), Midwest (23 percent) and the fewest in the Northeast (17 percent).

·        Production: In terms of brew production, homebrewers mainly stick to beer—60 percent of respondents only brew beer at home, compared to wine, mead or cider. AHA members and people affiliated with the AHA on average brewed nearly 10 batches of beer per year, at 7 gallons a batch, which is 15 percent more batches and nearly 30 percent more volume than homebrewers who were not affiliated with the AHA. Collectively, homebrewers produce more than 2 million barrels of brew a year, which represents a small but sizeable portion (1 percent) of total U.S. production.

·        Retail: Nearly all homebrewers (95 percent) shop in two local homebrew stores eight or nine times a year, while a majority (80 percent) also shops in three online stores five times a year. On average, homebrewers spend $800 a year—about $460 on general supplies and ingredients, and $330 on major equipment.

The survey was completed by more than 18,000 homebrewers via an online survey from July 30 to September 3, 2013. Of the respondents, 65 percent were members of the AHA, and 35 percent were unaffiliated homebrewers.

Information obtained via press release. Read about the American Homebrewers Association here